Addiction can take over anyone’s life, regardless of gender, race or social status. People who were once fun-loving and hardworking can lose interest in life entirely, causing them to fall out with friends and neglect their responsibilities. It doesn’t only blight the life of the sufferer but causes suffering for everyone who loves and cares about that person. It can feel as if there is no way out when you’re going through this experience, but recovery is possible for everyone.

Sadly, there is still a stigma attached to addiction, even though it’s a diagnosable mental health condition. Old-fashioned views that it represents weakness or immorality have been disproven by science, so there is no need to feel ashamed. Guilt and shame frequently prevent people from seeking the help they need, but it doesn’t have to be that way. You’re not alone, and by embracing the recovery community, you’re building yourself an integral support network.

If you or a loved one need help with addiction please call 844-254-9664 to speak with one of our experienced counselors. 

Who Needs to Go to Rehab?

Substance abuse disorders range from mild to severe. They are progressive illnesses, so seeking treatment as soon as possible gives you the best chance of recovery. There’s an 11-point criterion for diagnosis. If you can identify with two to three of the points, you have a mild substance use disorder; if you can apply four to five criteria to yourself, you have a moderate disorder; and six or more denotes a severe substance use disorder.

Whether your addiction is mild, moderate or severe, you’ll need to seek professional treatment to get to the root of the condition and help work towards long-term sobriety. Most mild substance use disorders will progressively get worse. The type of care you need depends on what you’ve been using and the severity of your addiction.

The 11 criteria are as follows:

  • Presentation of withdrawal symptoms when you stop using
  • Gradually building a higher tolerance to the substance
  • Using in spite of physical and/or mental health symptoms
  • Getting into dangerous situations while inebriated
  • Neglecting responsibilities due to drug or alcohol use
  • Substances are disrupting your interpersonal relationships
  • No longer taking part in pastimes you used to enjoy
  • Consistently craving alcohol or drugs
  • Spending most of your time thinking about, obtaining and using substances
  • Using more or more often than you had intended regularly
  • Trying and failing to cut down or stop using

Substance Abuse Resources

If you’re looking for help on how to get sober but feel overwhelmed by the conflicting information you’re finding, we’ve put together a list of local addiction treatment resources. There are plenty of support groups, including 12-step programs and SMART Recovery. These meetings will help you along each step of your recovery journey, from the first few weeks to several years after you’ve completed rehab.

The list also includes the various types of rehab facilities available to help you end your struggle with addiction. Whether you’ve been through treatment before or it’s your first time seeking help, you can get better. Explore the addiction resources available in your state to discover which combination of treatments is right for your individual situation.